Past Exhibitions

Deseret Morning News/Days of ’47 Landscape Art Show 2007 Color of the Land

Join us again this year as we present the juried selection of landscape art presented by the Days of ’47 celebration committee and the Deseret Morning News.

Albert Tissander: Drawings of Nature and Industry in the United States

MUAH presents fifty-six drawings from the 1885 cross-country expedition of French journalist, writer, and illustrator Albert Tissander. Tissander spent six months and created more than 200 works documenting the mountains, plains, Niagara Falls, the Great Salt Lake, Kanab, and the Grand Canyon, among other sites. The drawings represent a telling snapshot of geography and American life. The exhibition is on loan from the Utah Museum of Fine Arts.

Bath House
Bath House

City
City

Mammoth
Mammoth

Niagara
Niagara

Pink Cliffs
Pink Cliffs

Living Beautifully: Folk Art in Utah

MUAH presents an exhibition of contemporary art objects borrowed from the Museum of Utah Folk Art. This exhibition features some pieces that are rarely seen by the public and photographs of the artists at work.

Johnathan Black - Butterflies
Johnathan Black - Butterflies

Beaded Buffalo Bag
Beaded Buffalo Bag

President’s Art Show

The exhibition features 85 works of art created by Utah artists. The exhibition was juried by Richard Johnston, an artist working in California but who is a former faculty member at the University of Utah.

Painters of the Wasatch Mountains

The exibition provides a retrospect of Wasatch Mountain art, both geographically and chronologically. Selections of the more than 60 pieces on display illustrate the mountain territories from Mt. Nebo on the south to Logan Canyon on the northern end of the range. Compositions include expansive views of Mt. Olympus and Mount Timpanogos, as well as intimate profiles of geologic detail in lesser known locations.

Willie And Martin Remembered: A Tribute to the Mormon Handcart Pioneers

Thirty-five paintings and three sculptures, created by contemporary artists, tell some of the stories of the Willie and Martin handcart companies, who were trapped in the snows of Wyoming in 1856. The art works are accompanied by statements directly from the artists or from journal entries of the handcart pioneers. This exhibition is in conjunction with the PBS documentary “Sweetwater Rescue: The Martin and Willie Handcart Story”. Additional paintings and sculptures are found at the Museum of Church History and Art.

Greater Love (Sone Needed Carrying)
Greater Love (Some Needed Carrying) by Sandra B. Rast

A Century of Art: The Salt Lake City School District Collection

…original works of art by competent artists could inspire students to greater appreciation of beauty and the creative process.

Alice Merrill Horne

trailblazers by Elzy Bird
Trailblazers by Elzy Bird

The Salt Lake City School District has a significant collection of important works by Utah artists that is rarely glimpsed by the general public. Nearly 350 works comprise the collection, including works as early as an 1899 bronze statue of Paul Revere by sculptor Cyrus E. Dallin to a commissioned painting of the old Indian Hills Elementary School, completed in 2004 by David Meikle. These treasures grace the walls of administrative offices, libraries, and hallways. Just as children are the greatest asset of a school district, the works of art in this collection are a tangible asset of Salt Lake City School District’s vision to provide inspiration for students in their own creative processes and help them learn to appreciate fine art. It is fitting that this exhibition be held at the Museum of Utah Art & History, whose mission is to foster among people an awareness of, and excitement about, Utah art.

For this exhibition, only 68 works were selected. Some of those in the exhibition taught in the Salt Lake City School District: Bessie Bancroft at West Junior High School, Cornelius Salisbury who was head of the art department at West High School, Harold Peterson at Highland High School, and "Jack" Vigos at South and Highland High Schools.

The District’s vision states that it sets the standard for excellence in education. Alice Merrill Horne, who advocated for excellence in education through appreciation of fine art helped create the collection of the Salt Lake City School District and collections in other districts and schools as well. She also served as a legislator, art dealer, and PTA president. In addition to her arranging for works of art to be purchased by schools and districts, she loaned her private collection of art to be on view at West High School, West Junior High School, and Washington School, all in Salt Lake City School District. As early as 1931, she had held 129 exhibitions in 40 schools around the state. Her 1914 classic, Devotees and their Shrines: A Handbook of Utah Art, was adopted as a text and used in public schools in the state.

Today, students in the Salt Lake City School District have access to these paintings, elevating their appreciation of the creative arts, as was envisioned by Mrs. Horne. This exhibition celebrates the vision of the past and continues to set the standard for excellence in education.

The exhibition was curated through the collaborative efforts of David Ericson, owner of David Ericson Fine Art; Ann Orton, writer and co-author of Painters of the Wasatch Front; Dr. Maria L. Peterson, retired Fine Arts Supervisor of the Salt Lake City School District; Janie L. Rogers, art collector and founding member of Associated Art Historians, Inc.; Board of Trustees of the Salt Lake Education Foundation; Kandace Steadman, Executive Director of the Museum of Utah Art & History; Daphne Williams, Director of the Salt Lake Education Foundation; and McKell Withers and the staff of the Salt Lake City School District.

Funding for the exhibition comes from the generous support of the Salt Lake Education Foundation, Reagan Outdoor Advertising, Wachovia Securities, Wasatch Advisors, the Crossings at Lake Creek, and the T.A. and L.B Horne Foundation.

Captain James Brown

A member of the historical Mormon Battalion, Captain James Brown came to Utah with $5,000 in Spanish doubloons, his payment for his participation in the Mexican War. As an agent of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Brown spent $1,950 of his earnings to purchase land from Miles Goodyear, a homesteader, in what would later become Weber County. The purchase included 210 square miles of land, Fort Buenaventura near the Weber River, agricultural development around the fort, cattle, goats, sheep and a cat. The deal was finalized November 25, 1847. The area became known as Brown Settlement and consisted of several block houses that eventually became what is now Ogden City.

Browns greatest influence was perhaps due to his agricultural vision. He was instrumental in growing enough crops to feed scores of area settlers, including those ravaged by draught and crickets. Few early pioneers left a larger impact on the area than James Brown. He was truly one of Ogden’s founding fathers.